The Presidency has commended the South African Supreme Court of Appeal’s decision of October 3rd, 2016, confirming the conviction of Mr. Henry Okah of 20 years in prison having found him guilty on two out of the six-count charges relating to bomb explosions in Warri, Delta State.

The court also upheld the 12-year sentence for his role in the Abuja bombing. The convictions that were upheld are those in respect of the Warri bombing relating to Okah’s providing finance and equipment without which the bombing would not have been executed.

A presidency official who spoke on the condition of anonymity told State House correspondents that the Nigerian government had written “a measured letter” to the South African government, hailing the judicial decision as a big step forward towards removing terrorism from the continent.

The source said: “South Africa has projected itself an enduring partner to Nigeria in the war against terrorism. When African countries act jointly against terrorism, they send out clear and unambiguous signals that there is no more a place for terrorism on our continent.”

The court held that Okah provided more than two million Naira (N2 million) to three individuals for the purpose of acquiring vehicles and explosives for use in the Warri bombing.

On the Abuja bombing, the court upheld Okah’s conviction for conspirinng, planning and instructing people in relation to its execution while he was in South Africa.

The ourt therefore, held that exemption clause on extra-territorial application could not apply as Okah orchestrated the Abuja bombing while in South African territory.

The Supreme Court of Appeal of South Africa, by this judgment has effectively reduced the 12-year sentence for Warri bombing to eight (8) years but maintaining the 12–year sentence for the Abuja bombing, making the period 20 years all together as against the 24 years ruling by a lower court

For Adverts Placement, Inquiries, Free News Updates, Or Publication Of Articles, CALL OR CONTACT US ON WhatsApp: 08032426647.

Face Comments